Land Dispossession jury please Consider the Verdict

Consider the Verdict

Land Dispossession jury please Consider the Verdict, 

Kaalvoet Comment:

Dispossession:  The Action of depriving someone on land, property, or other possessions.

Few South African elite, seem to understand the concept of dispossession, we talk about who was in South Africa first, as the rightful owners of the land. Conveniently divide the black groups into Koi, Khoisan, and other blacks, attributing the original occupancy to the Koi and Khoisan, and claim that other blacks came from the North.

We ignore the fact that the Dutch, arrived as the Dutch East Indies Company, a chartered Dutch Company, and that the Netherlands never officially attached South Africa, the English East Indies Company overpowered the Dutch East Indies Company, and took control of their possessions.

What did the Dutch, and what did the English annexe by 1835, and had they in nearly 200 years, achieve fair dispossession of the entire South Africa, and was this dispossession, in the name of every white that would settle in South Africa?

The Portuguese, Italians, Germans, French, Swiss, many of these communities, will be heard to support that the Koisan comment on who beat the white to their possession.

By 1900, in the ‘colonised Africa’ the old Free State and Transvaal, were ZAR Republics, officially in the hands of the Boer.

In the comment below, a quote from the Library of US Congress, by the time the white arrived in the Eastern Frontier, the Nguni densely occupied the Eastern Cape.

The Kaalvoet Comment reflects that none of the ‘control’ structures, by the various Country powers, has any relevance to where our black people were fairly dispossessed, our black people were dispossessed through the 1913 Native Land Act, they should have had the same rights as the white foreigners, the Portuguese, Italians, Germans, French, Swiss, and other groups, to purchase and possess land.

Land Dispossession took place through until the 1990s, and all whites benefitted from this Land Dispossession, if it were not for this land dispossession, as a result of the 1913 Native Land Act, today Rosebank and Sandton, would have been owned by black people, off the Alexandra residential  development, and the Sandton and Rosebank areas, would be Alexandra Extensions 10 to 25.

Let us not say it happened 100 years ago, 200 years ago, 300 years ago, and there is nothing that can be done.

It happened 30 years ago, and there is something that should be done.

Walk the streets of the Townships, talk to the people, and we will find solutions.

Kaalvoet de la Harpe

*******

Consider the Verdict

Soweto Walking Tour

Home

 

From the U.S. Library of Congress:

The British adopted contradictory policies in ruling their newly acquired Cape Colony in the first three decades of the nineteenth century. Having seized the Cape from the VOC in 1795, the British returned the colony to the Dutch government in 1803 when peace had been concluded with the French. In 1806, however, with the beginning of the Napoleonic Wars, the British again took the Cape in order to protect the sea route to their Asian empire. Like the VOC before them, the British tried to keep the costs low and the settlement small. Local officials continued the policy of relying on imported slave labor rather than encouraging European immigration with the latter’s implication of permanent and expanding settlement. They also introduced racially discriminatory legislation to force Khoikhoi and other so-called “free” blacks to work for as little as possible. The Hottentot Code of 1809 required that all Khoikhoi and other free blacks carry passes stating where they lived and who their employers were. Persons without such passes could be forced into employment by white masters.

The British attempted to alleviate the land problems of Boers in the eastern Cape by sending imperial armies against the Xhosa of the Zuurveld (literally, “sour grassland,” the southernmost area of Bantu-speaking settlement, located between the Sundays River and the Great Fish River). They attacked the Xhosa from 1799 to 1803, from 1811 to 1812, and again from 1818 to 1819, when at last, through ruthless warfare, they succeeded in expelling the Africans into the area north of the Great Fish River. Thereafter, the British sought to create a fixed frontier by settling 5,000 British-assisted immigrants on smallholder farms created out of land seized from the Xhosa south of the Great Fish River and by clearing all lands between the Great Fish River and the Keiskama River of all forms of African settlement.

But other policies and developments worked against these measures. In 1807 Parliament in London ordered an end to British participation in the slave trade everywhere in the world. This decision threatened the basis of the Cape’s labor supply, for farmers in the eastern areas as well as in the west.

British missionaries, who were active in South Africa for the first time in the 1810s and who had a sympathetic audience in Britain, condemned the cruel labor practices often adopted by Trekboers against their slave and Khoikhoi workers and decried the discriminatory provisions of the Hottentot Code. Although British officials did not rescind the legislation, they did respond to this criticism by establishing a circuit court to monitor conditions in the western Cape. This court offended many Boer sensibilities by giving equal weight to the evidence of “servants” and “masters,” black and white alike. The British also raised a force of colonial police, including Khoikhoi regulars, to enforce the court’s authority. In 1815 a Dutch-speaking Afrikaner farmer who refused to answer a court summons for mistreating a Khoikhoi employee was shot dead while resisting arrest. Relatives and neighbors rose in what became known as the Slachter’s Nek Rebellion, but their resistance was soon crushed, and the British hanged five of the rebels.

British policies on the eastern frontier also engendered growing Boer hostility. The attempt to close the frontier in 1819-20 following the defeat of the Xhosa and the importation of British immigrants only exacerbated land shortages. British settlers found that they could not make a living from small farms, and they competed with the Dutch pastoralists for the limited arable land available, thereby intensifying Boer-British tensions.

The British government, acting largely at the behest of the missionaries and their supporters in Britain in the 1820s, abolished the Hottentot Code. Ordinance 50 of 1828 stated that no Khoikhoi or free black had to carry a pass or could be forced to enter a labor contract. Five years later, the British Parliament decreed that slavery would no longer be permitted in any part of the empire. After a four-year period of “apprenticeship,” all slaves would become free persons, able, because of Ordinance 50, to sell their labor for whatever the market would bear. Moreover, slaveowners were to receive no more than one-third of the value of their slaves in official compensation for the loss of this property. The Boers felt further threatened when, in 1834 and 1835, British forces, attempting to put a final stop to Boer-Xhosa frontier conflict, swept across the Keiskama River into Xhosa territory and annexed all the land up to the Keiskama River for white settlement. In 1836, however, the British government, partly in response to missionary criticism of the invasion, returned the newly annexed lands to the Xhosa and sought a peace treaty with their chiefs.

 

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#PitToilet Death exposes Apartheid thinking


#PitToilet Death exposes Apartheid thinking.

Our radio is on Radio 702 all day, I listen, I smile, I use this station, their presenters and their listeners / callers, as a barometer to measure the level of Apartheid, that still exists in our country.

For the past eight years, this media community, have attacked President Jacob Zuma, and the ANC, 700 corruption charges, rape, State Capture, you name it.

I have a little respect for President Jacob Zuma,he is the only Black leader who has blamed Apartheid for the problems we face today.

The 702 radio community, would criticise the President for blaming Apartheid, they would loudly acclaim that Apartheid is dead and buried.

Kaalvoet de la Harpe, on a daily basis will tell his international tourists that Apartheid is still alive and well, that he does not respect the Apartheid Museum as Apartheid is not dead, the day that he finds white people visiting the communities in the Rural Villages and Townships, Kaalvoet would celebrate the end of Apartheid.

Back to the Pit Toilet death, and my sympathies to the family, the school principal, the school teachers, and the school community.

702 Apartheid and Racist comments that are heard, are something like the following one;

The Government should be ashamed, it is because it is a black child, that they only value the child’s life at R 450 000,00.  

The Presenter accepts this, allowing the 702 community to escalate their anti-government, black on black abuse, leaving the community to believe that, had this child been white, and had the government been white, the parents would have been paid R 2 000 000,00.

Why does Kaalvoet link the comments heard on Radio 702, to ’Pit Toilet Death exposes Apartheid thinking’?

The comments never refer to the fact that 80% of all blacks living in rural village communities, use Pit Toilets, they have no option.

#PitToilet exposes Apartheid Thinking
#PitToilet exposes Apartheid Thinking
#PitToilet exposes Apartheid Thinking
#PitToilet exposes Apartheid Thinking

 

Most of the black people living in the informal squatter communities, use the ‘Plastic Toilet” system, and when the bowl is full, a child would drown if a child fell into the bowl.

#PitToilet exposes Apartheid Thinking
#PitToilet exposes Apartheid Thinking

The elders, the parents, the families, need to protect their children from Pit Toilet Deaths, and Plastic Toilet Deaths, on a daily basis.

How do they achieve this?

Many keep the door locked, forcing the children to use the ground, many young children are skilled at protecting themselves.

#PitToilet exposes Apartheid Thinking
#PitToilet exposes Apartheid Thinking

When it gets to the school environment, the Principal and Teachers, may have 300 children, most, ‘skilled’ at keeping themselves safe in the face of the Pit Toilet, and an accident can happen.

The Radio 702 community, show no empathy for the Principal, the Teachers, or the community, facing issues that are directly linked to our mutual heritage.

The Radio 702 community, call for the Government to pay the additional R 1 550 000,00 to compensate the family fully, but have we heard of caller, one Presenter, even mention the millions of children, that need to survive the Pit Toilet Death, every day.

To the White South Africans, and elite Blacks, Colonisation and Apartheid caused the Pit Toilet Death problem, if it was not for the Coloniser, our Blacks would be the wealth of South Africa today, the Townships would not exist today, Black Poverty would not exists, and our Rural Villages would have developed off the elite and middle class blacks, if we had allowed it.

Please do not attack, unless you give some Enlightened Thinking to the problem.

Kaalvoet de la Harpe

#PitToilet exposes Apartheid Thinking
#PitToilet exposes Apartheid Thinking
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Alexandra Township Tour

ALEXANDRA TOWNSHIP TOUR:

Alexandra  Tour, the  microcosm of South Africa, a must visit.

A LOOK AT ALEXANDRA TOWNSHIP TOUR

Alexandra Township informal shack development
Alexandra Township informal shack development

Alexandra  Tour Rates:

Departing Melville with Taste of Africa,  half-day visit, R 500 per person sharing.

Departing Sandton Central Business District using local shared taxi from Sandton, hosted by our guide:

4 hour visit, R 350 per person sharing, excluding the local transport, payable by the visitor.

 SUNRISE WALK & other tours:

Alexandra Township Tour
Alexandra Township Tour

Alexandra Township Tour – ‘SUNRISE WALK’  R 500 pp (min 2pax)

When we experienced the walk through Alexandra from 05:30 to 08:30, (winter 06:30 to 09:30), we experienced the Alex that we found the most attractive. Could it just be that it is cool, even the winter months can be hot during the day, or just that the magic of Alex waking up and rising around you is magic, you decide.

In the interests of Radical Economic Transformation in the tourism industry, these tours are intended to cater for the Sandton visitor, where our guides can host your access, through the local taxi transport in and out of Alexandra Township.

Any Half-Day Trip ex-Melville will only take place for the 05:30, 08:30 and 13:30 time slot.

Alexandra Township Tour

If departing Sandton, our guide will meet you at your hotel, if central in Sandton, or, at the Gautrain Station at 05:30, hosting you while using the local taxi from Sandton, our preferred option.

Should you wish to self-drive into Alex, we will provide directions to our guide controller on 2nd Avenue Alexandra, where you can safely park your vehicle.

Your guide will walk the area indicated in the map below compliments of Google.

Alexandra Township the area we cover.
Alexandra Township the area we cover.

From 1st Avenue, the taxi link and business area, we move through the small market places, moving through the Zulu enclave, and high density shack accommodation, where one of our guides lived, chased out by his neighbours in March 1991.

Taste of Africa visits the Madala Men’s Hostel, the heart of the 1991 conflict in Alexandra, considered a no-go area by most people.

From the male hostel and Zulu enclave, we walk via the upmarket Phase 2 with manicured gardens, an Island in the middle of the Chaos, pass the Female Hostel, walk through the high-density squatter community, the ‘Favela’ on 6th,

Alexandra Township Tour the vibe on the street
Alexandra Township Tour the vibe on the street

We pass the Room where Nelson Mandela stayed in the 1940s on 7th Avenue, then depending on time, a look at a few of the lower Avenues, before we head back to the business district and board that taxi back to Sandton:

Should the visitor wish to get deeper down into Alexandra, a trip in one of the small ‘cockroach’ taxi, will allow us to move deeper into Alexandra, and experience the cockroach.

No where in South Africa will you experience the diversity that you will experience in the 1 square kilometre of the old DARK CITY, that is Alexandra Township:

Join us for an experience you will never forget.

Cedric

If we wish to extend the morning visit, and stay for lunch, once again, Cedric’s favourite lunch venue is the Alexandra Men’s Hostel, please discuss this option with Cedric.

Alexandra lunch another one of Cedric's favourite venues.
Alexandra lunch another one of Cedric’s favourite venues.

A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY:

Alexandra, originally established as a white Township in the 1890’s then, when unable to sell land, the developer converted the Township to a black Township in 1912, sold all the land as the 1913 Land Act approached.

During the 1950s Alexandra was famous for the 2 American type gangs that controlled the area.

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Alexandra, like Sophiatown, Kliptown and other areas in South Africa, was ripped apart by the expropriation of all residential land, and the forceful removal of residents to Diepkloof in Soweto, and other areas.

It was the Apartheid Government’s intention to use the land for Hostel Type dwellings, to provide accommodation for the labour force, and by 1963 the male and female hostels were built.

In contrast to the forced removals in Sophiatown, because Alex was due to remain a black area, the Council started to collect rentals on all accommodation that was not vacated.

This resulted in difficulty to remove the land-owners who preferred to stay, and great conflict existed through till the 1970s when Rev Buti was able to change the Council’s minds and the development of Alex was again started.

During the early 1980s, through some link by a financial institutions, contractors, and Councillors, property was re-sold to those who could afford bond homes. You paid a deposit, and an appointed contractor built the homes through a link to the building society.

Then, in 1984 conflict in the Townships, the 1986 the rent and services boycott, aimed at all the accommodation owned by the Council impacted on those Land-owners who maintained the control over their properties. To-date, no rent is being paid, and conflict exists in many ‘land-owner groups’ who claim ownership, in the face of Government Ownership.

This was followed by the removal of the restrictions on ‘influx-control’ and Alex was one of the first areas where informal shack accommodation swelled, resulting in the over-populated conditions we find today, high-density accommodation that the sewerage system can’t handle.

During 1990, when black on black violence, allegedly driven by outside forces, spread throughout the country, Alex, the ‘Dark City’ maintained relative peace. Then in March 1991 the IFP / ANC violence erupted in the area around the Mens Hostel.

Many died, and all non-Zulus were chased out of the area, many of them leaving all their belongings and fleeing.

This section today is still occupied by the Zulu contingent that occupied this enclave.

This is a brief introduction to the dynamics that we need to be aware of, and dynamics that should attract South African’s to visit the microcosm of South Africa’s scattered problems.

Cedric de la Harpe;

The You Tube in this post gives you a look at Nettie and Cedric de la Harpe’s background to Responsible Travel, and how it has impacted on our Alexandra Township initiative:

While you are looking at Alexandra, maybe Soweto is your other option?

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Johannesburg Cheap Transport Local Taxi

Johannesburg Cheap Transport Local Taxi

Cheap transport, to and from ORT Airport, Apartheid Museum, Constitution Hill,  Johannesburg Cheap Transport  Local  Taxi,

In order to spend a number of days in Johannesburg, the visitor needs to be introduced to the  Johannesburg Cheap Transport  Local  Taxi, and to attract the international visitor to this site, already popular with our local people, Taste of Africa introduces cheap, quick, easy access, to visiting the Apartheid Museum, see below.

As they were raised in Melville, both Nettie and Cedric de la Harpe will not be blamed for promoting Melville as the ideal base for your Johannesburg sojourn.

To assist the budget traveller, and those who would prefer to spend their available money, on more than just transport, we will run this blog to create a culture of using the cheap transport systems, allowing you to invest in our magic.

What is our motivation for this initiative, where we lose a little on transfer costs, we will make up on providing the visitor with the magic experience of walking the streets of Johannesburg, Soweto and Alexandra.

APARTHEID MUSEUM:

For the visitor who wishes to visit the Apartheid Museum via local taxi transport, you may use the Bree Street taxi rank, see below. Mid-way between West & Sauer Streets is and entrance with a stairway to the upper floor, use the steps to the upper floor, turn right at the top, follow to the end and turn left, and then mid-way on the left is an entrance to the upper-floor.

Enter, and to your right, approx 3rd lane, ask for the Baza-Baza taxi, and tell the driver and passengers you wish to be dropped at the Apartheid Museum. This is important, the taxi has options that could result in taxi not passing AM: 

The Bree Street Rank reflects the vast changes of South African life. The ranks, when I was younger, 30 to 40 years ago, were the public parking garages, used mainly by the whites. Then, as the whites moved out of the Central Business District, and the parking garages stood empty for years, the taxi industry were housed in these buildings. The City of Johannesburg, as part of their beautifying the city project, has commissioned numerous interesting pieces of art that surround these ranks.

Both on the ground floor, and the upper-level, there are hawkers and small businesses providing for the commuters daily needs. Almost every commuter requires to use two, maybe three taxi rides to get to work in the morning. and often, the closest that the commuters get to shopping, is while they are changing from one taxi route to another.

Melville Taxi:

When visiting Melville, or returning to Melville, to locate the Melville taxi, use the same entrance as described above, take the steps down to basement, turn left, keep left and take the next step to the lower level, and then turn right, crossing over to the first paved isle, which service at the terminal, ask for the Melville taxi.

When leaving Melville, use Main Road, south, or Kingsway, east, index finger in the air, will stop the taxi. 3 fingers indicates Bree Street, 5 fingers indicates Noord Street.

Just after you pass the Gas Works, on the corner of Enoch Sontongo Street,the taxi may stop, this is if the driver is aware that a passenger wishes to divert past the Oriental Plaza, Newtown to Bree rank. At this stage, passengers are redistributed as the same association shares the passengers among the two routes.

This is your opportunity to visit the Oriental Plaza en route to Newtown. 

For those of you who would prefer a guide to experience the magic of these areas, Taste of Africa will oblige, we are just not into, selling the typical tourist site, that only requires transfer.

Please also read in conjunction with, our Gautrain / Rea Vaya Public TTransport link page:  

Lets go into more detail:

Johannesburg Cheap Transport Local  Taxi:

This section is aimed at permitting the more adventurous visitor to get through Johannesburg, and into Soweto while they appreciate the magic that exists, as economically as possible.

For those who have climbed Kilimanjaro, I always say, reaching the Peak was great, but I will always remember the getting there. 

Use this section in combination with the traditional Street Maps and guide books.

Taste of Africa will assist with any enquiries via contact below, or info@tasteofafrica.co.za, provided you make enquiries seven days ahead of your visit. For those visitors who make use of a Taste of Africa guiding services through Johannesburg & Soweto, we will support you throughout your stay in Johannesburg, should you wish to venture through Johannesburg on your own.

‘Local shared taxi’ a negative in the suburban South African communities, but the daily mode of transport for 65% of the South African community.

Johannesburg cheap transport, the old Bara taxi rank
Johannesburg cheap transport local taxi, the old Bara taxi rank

You are able to board a local taxi on most corners in the Urban areas, however, at peak times it is often essential to stand in the queue at the taxi rank, as the taxi will be fill when they pass. We must warn you, many of the boarding stations very little respect for age and gender is given, if the taxi door opens, get in first, else you will be left on the street.

In general, the index finger pointed towards the sky will stop a taxi heading for the centre of the city, however, many ranks also have their individual signs when a route provides the service to more than one rank.

When in the taxi rank, ask the drivers/controllers to ensure that you are boarding the correct taxi, tell the driver and passengers where you wish to alight, if you are boarding on a street corner, ask other on the corner for the desired hand-sign for your destination.

When boarding a taxi always have your fare ready, do not use large notes early in the morning. The fares are passed from the rear of the taxi to the passenger sitting alongside the driver, or alternatively to the driver. Where possible you are expected to collect fares and take change during the process to relieve the driver of the load. Just a word of warning, ask, there are areas where payments take place at certain points en route, and sometimes, just before you alight. 

Always ensure that the driver knows where you wish to be dropped, and do not hesitate to talk to your fellow passengers if you are not sure.

Our support information will prepare you for what you can expect when you arrive at the terminal, in order that you do not give the appearance of being lost on arrival.

Throughout the world you need to be aware, do not be careless with your camera, do not flash your wallet around, and decline an offer of any ‘tout’ who wishes to show you around.

Read up before you venture into the area, know what you are visiting and the times that they are open.

In these high-density pedestrian traffic areas that you will go through at the taxi terminals, the community are very aware of your level of anxiety. The more relaxed you are, the more you are respected.

Cedric de la Harpe +27 82 565 2520 

BREE STREET RANK:

The Bree Street rank services the Soweto, Melville to Rosebank / Randburg areas, and through to Hillbrow.

Situated on Bree Street, central Johannesburg, between Sauer Street and West St / the Street that crosses the Nelson Mandela Bridge:

From Melville you will cross the Nelson Mandela Bridge. Then alight as the taxi take the left just before the rank.

When using the taxi to Bree, and you wish to get to Noord, please ask the driver, they could be including the Noord in their link.

Click on this Google Link for the Metro Taxi / Bree Street Taxi Rank, 

The Bree / Metro Taxi rank, is to the right top, of the google map, and  the Newtown Precinct, to the left and lower of the view:

The Newtown area, off the Museum Africa area,  is a short walk.

Bree Street taxi rank, a hub for the Johannesburg Day Visit, Cheap Transport initiative
Bree Street taxi rank, a hub for the Johannesburg Cheap Transport  Local Taxi, Bree Street Rank

Off this corner, walk down the road, towards the Newtown area:

The Art work, corner Bree and Sauer Street, is your landmark, for access to the Newtown Area on Johannesburg Cheap Transport  Local Taxi
The Art work, corner Bree and Sauer Street, is your landmark, for access to the Newtown Area on Johannesburg Cheap Transport  Local Taxi

A look at the Johannesburg Central Business District, (Downtown).

Downtown Johannesburg Cheap Transport Option
Downtown Johannesburg Cheap Transport Local Taxi, Option

The Newtown Area:

A visit to Newtown wouldn’t be complete without taking in some of the restaurants and nightlife spots which lend themselves to the eclectic, multicultural, artistic reputation of the area.

See below for more details.

The Market Theatre

Tel: +27 (0)11 832-1641
Website: www.markettheatre.co.za
Address: 56 Margaret Mcingana Street

Museum Africa

Tel: +27(0)11 833-5624
Website: www.museumafrica.org
Address: 121 Bree Street
Open: Tues to Sun 09h00-17h00, closed on Monday

Sci-Bono Discovery Centre

Tel: +27(0)11 639-8400
Website: www.sci-bono.co.za
Address: Corner Miriam Makeba and President streets, Newtown
Open: 09h00 to 17h00 (16h30 on weekends/ holidays)

Niki’s Oasis

Tel: +27(0)11 492-1134 & 838-9733
Address: 138 Bree Street
Open: Monday 12h00 to 00h00, Tuesday 12h00 to 22h00, Wednesday to Sat 12h00 to 00h00, closed on Sunday.

Bassline (live music venue)

Tel: +27(0)11 838 9145/6
Website: www.bassline.co.za
Address: 10 Henry Nxumalo Street

Sophiatown Bar Lounge

Tel: +27 (0)11 836-5999
Website: www.sophiatownbarlounge.co.za
Address: 1 Central Place, Jeppe Street
Open: Monday to Wednesday 10h30 to 21h00, Thursday to Saturday 10h30 to 02h00 and Sunday 11h30 to 20h00

Constitution Hill:

Constitution Hill, can be accessed from the Bree Street taxi rank, either using the taxi that goes to Yeoville, or a walk via Mandela Bridge and Braamfontein.

Coming in from Sandton, towards the Noord Street rank, the driver can drop you a block away, coming from Melville, you can alight, as you approach the Mandela Bridge, and walk up through Braamfontien, moving around the Civic centre. 

Noord Street Taxi Rand:

The Noord Street Taxi Rank, consists on the enclosed MTN Rank, as seen below, but also covers the extended are as discussed below.

Noord Street is easily accessed when arriving by taxi from the Northern and Eastern suburbs and Alexandra. It is recognised by the high density taxi traffic and the high density pedestrian traffic.

Taxis travelling from the Melville Area, do have the option of taking you through to Noord Street, check with the driver, if not, there is a ‘local feed’ operating between Bree and Noord.

Taxis are restricted to leave from certain ranks, but when the arrive in central Johannesburg, there is very little restriction.

Johannesburg Cheap Transport Option Local Taxi Noord Street Node.
Johannesburg Cheap Transport  Local Taxi Noord Street Taxi Rank Node.
Noord Street area
Noord Street area, Johannesburg Cheap Transport Local  Taxi.

This Google Map view of the area, prepares you for your transit;

From the North and East, many taxi’s arrive in the Noord Street area on Klein Street, travelling from North to South.

From this rank you will access taxi’s to Pretoria, Sandton, Alexandra, and suburbs to the East.

On your left is Joubert Park, then the Johannesburg Art Gallery, your taxi will pass the JAG on the left, cross the rail line, and first a shopping centre on your left. You will need to alight between Noord Street and De Villiers Street. The Rank now is enclosed, as per picture above, the view is shown from Twist Street, and the shopping centre is on your right.

If wishing to move to the Bree Street Taxi Rank, move to the far side of the MTN Taxi Tank to Plain Street, diagonally opposite on the left, Corner Klein and Plein Street, under the big sign, Taxi Butchery, you board the taxi to Bree.

The Drill Hall can be visited while in the area, walk through between the MTN Taxi Rank and the shopping centre, and cross Twist Street, the large red building seen opposite.

The Extended Noord Street Taxi Rank area:

ORT Airport:

Travellers wishing to access the ORT Airport Cheaply, can do so, using local taxi transport, from the MTN rank, move along De Villiers Street, in an Easterly Direction, keeping the Drill Hall, the large red brick building, on your left, continue two blocks or so, towards claim street, and you will find, by asking, a taxi that will take you to ORT Airport:

From ORT Airport to Johannesburg:

This is the more difficult option, mainly because you must not ask for assistance, there is no person on the airport who will believe that you can use a local taxi, after-all, you have enough money to used an expensive taxi.

Leave the arrivals terminal, onto the road way, turn right, and walk towards the oncoming vehicles that are arriving. As you leave the arrivals terminal, keep right, you will reach a fork that takes you down to a road way, at a lower level. Parked just under the vehicle ramp, you will find a shared taxi, if not, ask a local, the taxi will arrive soon.

During the morning, and late afternoon, your taxi will take you straight to the De Villiers Street rank, two blocks from the MTN rank, should they not be travelling direct, they will move via the Kempton Park taxi rank, where you may need to switch taxi.

A few years back, using this link, we could access Soweto, via the MTN rank for a total of R 45, today it my be R 60.

Wanderers Street, Long Distance Taxi Rank: 

Johannesburg’s link to Long Distance Taxi’s depart from the seen on the Google Map, just north of Noord Street, on Wanderers Street. You must get there early in the morning if you wish to use this service.

I would suggest that you visit the area the day before you wish to depart, but it is not necessary. Google View, Taxi Rank on left, Bridge Shopping Centre on the right. 

Faraday Taxi Rank

Situated on Faraday off Eloff Street, neighbour to the Faraday Traditional Medicine Market, well worth a visit.  

Taxi Routes:

Faraday:   Natalspruit Steeldale  Southgate The Hill Thokoza Alberton  The Glen Shopping Centre  Bassonia

Please feel free to call me, Cedric 082 565 2520.

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Please feel free to call me, Cedric 082 565 2520.

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NATIVE LAND ACT. NO 27. of 1913

Natives Land Act No. 27 of 1913 

Today I celebrate the anniversary of the day I started to research my history and South Africa’s history.

During Black & White Intercourse in Soweto, I am asked questions that I answer, but I know that my answers are only being accepted because I am white and superior. When I get home I start to seek answers to these questions.

Three months pass and I am no wiser, then, one night I have a dream, and I wake from a nightmare, during the dream I am as black as the Ace of spades, and during the early hours of the morning, I still believe I am black.

As per usual, I start with my email and computer activities first thing in the morning. Having completed my email replies, I start to scrutinise the research material that I had been accumulating for months, and I see the content completely differently.

As this occurs I feel relieved, my body is white, it is just that my mind has shifted into reading and observing everything through the eyes of the ‘still disadvantaged black’, or from the ‘black cage’ as we refer to this group.

The research material becomes an eye-opener, I see evidence that my white family did steal everything from the blacks, I become a ‘Revolutionary’, I become an introvert, afraid to talk about my feelings.

During the next six months my research goes further back, searching for the motivation of the Native Land Act of 1913, and it takes me into the late 19th century, and from there into the mining sector and why the labour unrest of today.

You will find various web sites where I blog personally, where I talk Economic Freedom Charter, where I talk Social Cohesion, where I talk Land Reform, but this month I have decided to risk my capitalist business interests, and talk South African History on the Taste of Africa site.

19th June 2014, one-hundred and one years after the commencement of Native Land Act of 1913, one year into my research, the day that I launch my reflections on our history and the impact that it has had on our society.

Cedric de la Harpe

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